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Friday, 22 July 2016 00:00

Data data data –are you analysing it or what?

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You know what’s fun? Analysing data – that’s what! You know what’s not fun? Spending hours and hours of time ‘analysing’ data, when all you‘re actually doing is reshuffling and changing columns, names, rows, dates, data types and any other number of errors just so you can do the analysis. All you really want to do is make some sense of your data and make a pretty graph or two so that you can show all your friends. Getting to this ‘fun’ step however, generally takes a lot longer than it should. Years ago I was working in a project…
By Neal Dalgliesh and Skye Gabb Neal Dalgliesh is an agricultural research consultant and CSIRO research fellow who has worked on agricultural research projects in Asia, Africa and Australia, specialising in soils and farming systems research 1. How do you soil sample? I would separate soil sampling into 2 different types, soil characterization and soil monitoring. Characterization is a one off procedure to determine a soil’s ability to hold water available for crop use, once this is known it is not necessary for it to be done again, unless something changes in the particular soil or another crop is planned…
By Neal Dalgliesh and Skye Gabb Neal Dalgliesh is an agricultural research consultant and CSIRO research fellow who has worked on agricultural research projects in Asia, Africa and Australia, specialising in soils and farming systems research 1. Why is it important to soil sample when researching crop production? It’s important to soil sample in all agricultural research projects – both national and international. You need to know what’s going on underneath you before you can make judgements about what you’re seeing on top. For example: In Australia, when we first started sampling for deep nitrogen (N), farmers had no idea…
  By Di Mayberry, Julia Hoy, Nick Hudson, Dennis Poppi, Megan Sullivan   Conferences are an important part of being a scientist. And while catching up on the latest news in your field can be exciting, it’s the networking opportunities at these events that will help to shape your future career. Meeting new people can help you get a job, find research collaborators, solve a science problem, secure funding, publish papers and much more. Many young scientists find networking intimidating, so we’ve put together a few tips to help you get the most out of your next conference experience. Plan…
By Lachlan Dennis After a quick scramble to make the connection from Port Moresby I’m there. On a plane to tropical Kavieng for a week. With much of the plane full of ACIAR researchers we fly past the smoking craters dotting New Britain and Tavurvur volcano, responsible for the devastation of 1994. Lush rainforest beneath us and aquamarine blue shining up from the fringing reefs. The plane makes a quick stop at Kokopo and lets off three quarters of the passengers, not enough get back on to replace them. The airport is dotted with coconut palms, reef egrets take to…