Blog

My husband Alex is a passionate coffee drinker, a tragic addict. Being from Spain, he is in constant pursuit of the ‘café cortado’. It’s not a latte, it has less milk and it’s not an expresso, it has some milk.  He prefers it if the milk is warm, not added as an after-thought like it sometimes is at hotel breakfasts and definitely not a scalding 2000⁰C which is common in some parts of the world. The perfect coffee experience. Christmas day 2015 in Vientiane, Laos.  Like any addiction, there are highs and lows to the coffee experience and these are…
Wednesday, 21 September 2016 00:00

Developing value chains in Asia – a complicated, long-term process

Written by Rohan
I recently read a journal article which highlighted smallholders in East Asian economies as persistent and resilient, but only on paper. In reality, smallholders in these countries have been caught between a world of a rapidly modernizing agriculture sector, in which smallholders are often seen as impediments to growth, and the lure of better paying non-farm jobs in the city for which young people are leaving behind farms and families.  Figure 1. Rohan with Dr. Wahida Maghraby of ICASEPS (Indonesian Centre for Agricultural Socio Economic and Policy Studies) In the world of international agricultural research 'Smallholders' has become a fancy…
Wednesday, 14 September 2016 00:00

You never know who you might meet on international projects!

Written by Skye Gabb
Caitlin McQuarrie (BVSc V, University of Sydney) Recently, as part of my final year of my Veterinary training, I undertook a month-long rotation in Luang Prabang, Laos, gaining experience on large-scale animal health research projects. I had the opportunity to fly down to Vientiane to attend an Australian embassy event. As a recipient of the New Colombo Plan mobility scholarship, I was lucky to be invited to the graduation ceremony of about 60 Lao-Australia National Scholarship students from The Lao National University in Vientiane. The Australian Foreign Minister, the Hon Julie Bishop MP, was present to congratulate the students on…
By Shahla Hosseini Bai As an early career researcher, I have been fortunate to be involved in an Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) research project in Papua New Guinea which aims to commercialise Canarium indicum L. (Burseraceae) nuts. These nuts are commonly known as galip fruit in PNG, Ngali in the Solomon Islands and Nangaw in Vanuatu. Galip is an indigenous tree grown in tropical and subtropical forests which was originally domesticated for timber production. However, the fruit is also traditionally used as a source of food in the Pacific as it is rich in nutrients, protein and…
Friday, 02 September 2016 00:00

Waste not, want not: key messages from the Crawford Fund Annual Conference

Written by Skye Gabb
Skye Gabb and David McGill This week we attended the Crawford Fund Annual Conference “Waste not, want not: the circular economy to food security”, where industry and research leaders examined food loss and waste along the supply chain. Given the importance of this issue (1/3 of food is lost or wasted every year!), we thought we’d share some of our key take home messages from the conference. The most food waste and loss is “near the fork” in developed regions and “near the farm” in developing regions          Dr Karen Brooks, Dr Brian Lipinksi Food lost or…